Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate GOP’s epic failure to repeal Obamacare

What a night! Breaking ranks with a party that was hellbent on denying millions affordable health insurance, Senators Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski and John McCain voted against the so-called “skinny repeal” of Obamacare. 

Tanner Curtis at The New York Times has detail on how it all went down:

The hustle and bustle in the Capitol’s hallways faded into stillness as the hours dragged by. Aides, glued to their cellphones as they waited for instructions, paced or sat; others hauled in boxes of pizza. […] The events played out 52 years after Congress approved legislation creating the Medicare and Medicaid programs, which President Lyndon B. Johnson signed into law on July 30, 1965. A bust of Mr. Johnson, who had served earlier as Senate majority leader and as vice president, is on display in the Capitol. /react-text

Here’s Michael Tomasky at The Daily Beast:

McCain’s vote—and Susan Collins’s and Lisa Murkowski’s;

Continue reading “Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate GOP’s epic failure to repeal Obamacare”

Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate Republicans begin their Obamacare repeal attempt

We begin today’s roundup with The New York Times and its editorial on yesterday’s votes in the Senate:

The majority leader, Mitch McConnell, browbeat and cajoled 50 members of his caucus to vote to begin a debate on health care without even telling the country which of several competing bills he wanted to pass. Vice President Mike Pence provided the tiebreaking vote. The proposals vary in severity, but all of them would leave millions more people without health insurance and make medical care unaffordable for many low-income and middle-class families. It is clear that Mr. McConnell does not much care which of these proposals the Senate passes; for whatever reason — pride, White House pressure, sheer cussedness — he just wants to get a bill out of the Senate. It could then go into conference with the House, which passed its own terrible bill in May.

Here’s George Zornick’s

Continue reading “Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate Republicans begin their Obamacare repeal attempt”

Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate GOP poised to vote on taking away health insurance from millions

We begin today’s roundup with Margaret Hartmann’s analysis at New York Magazine on today’s vote on the GOP’s tax cuts for the wealthy/health insurance plan, and specifically, the return of Senator John McCain to the floor for the crucial vote:

On Tuesday the Senate will vote on the American Health Care Act, which is the first step in their last-ditch effort to do … something to Obamacare this week. In a matter of days Senate Republicans may pass a bill that affects one fifth of the economy and millions of Americans’ lives, and incredibly, they have no idea what it might look like. […] McCain’s hasty return signals that the Republican leadership thinks they’re close to the 50 votes needed. He may wind up being the senator who revived Zombie Trumpcare one last time. […] 

If this were a movie, Tuesday would be the moment when McCains reclaims

Continue reading “Abbreviated pundit roundup: Senate GOP poised to vote on taking away health insurance from millions”

Abbreviated Pundit Round-up

With the Good Doctor unavailable this week (perhaps he’s off regenerating, I’ve heard that doctors do that), you’re stuck with me for two mornings in a row. But there is some good news. Since I already used my weekly Trump infographic on Sunday, that left room for a return of the much-beloved chemistry graphics from Compound Interest. You can find a larger version of the image on their site if you’re having trouble with the fine print. I picked the Luminol graphic because, considering one prominent story about Trump, it could be of serious use.

Donald Trump has been on the world’s biggest whine-a-thon of late, blaming everyone from his own Attorney General to the Special Counsel for the problems he brought on himself. His Sunday tweets broadened the scope of the attacks to include Republicans in general.

x

Abbreviated Pundit Round-up: Yellow orange edition

Donald Trump’s Saturday morning Twitter flurry, which included not one, or two, but three seperate tweets attacking Hillary Clinton should serve as a reminder that there’s one term that gets left out all too often when describing Trump. Sure. He’s a pompous jackass. Absolutely, he’s a know-nothing idiot who has not the first clue about history, or science, or the lives that are lived by people who weren’t born with a silver spoon in every orifice. But there’s one term that sums Donald Trump up better than all the rest.

He’s a coward.

Nine months after the election, Trump is still hiding behind HIllary’s skirts every time he feels the least bit of heat. 

x

So

Continue reading “Abbreviated Pundit Round-up: Yellow orange edition”

Abbreviated pundit roundup: A constitutional crisis in the making

Donald Trump’s comments during an interview this week with The New York Times reveal a president who believes he is above the law and who has no qualms about hinting at the firing of special counsel Robert Mueller. Indeed, as The New York Times reports:

President Trump’s lawyers and aides are scouring the professional and political backgrounds of investigators hired by the special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, looking for conflicts of interest they could use to discredit the investigation — or even build a case to fire Mr. Mueller or get some members of his team recused, according to three people with knowledge of the research effort.

Here is The New York Times editorial board on the interview:

In less than an hour on Wednesday afternoon, President Trump found a way to impugn the integrity and threaten the livelihoods of nearly all of the country’s top law

Continue reading “Abbreviated pundit roundup: A constitutional crisis in the making”

Abbreviated pundit roundup: A constitutional crisis in the making

Donald Trump’s comments during an interview this week with The New York Times reveal a president who believes he is above the law and who has no qualms about hinting at the firing of special counsel Robert Mueller. Indeed, as The New York Times reports:

President Trump’s lawyers and aides are scouring the professional and political backgrounds of investigators hired by the special counsel Robert S. Mueller III, looking for conflicts of interest they could use to discredit the investigation — or even build a case to fire Mr. Mueller or get some members of his team recused, according to three people with knowledge of the research effort.

Here is The New York Times editorial board on the interview:

In less than an hour on Wednesday afternoon, President Trump found a way to impugn the integrity and threaten the livelihoods of nearly all of the country’s top law

Continue reading “Abbreviated pundit roundup: A constitutional crisis in the making”