The Fix: Democrats’ Senate arm ended 2014 $20 million in debt. That’s not why they lost.

News that the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee is over $20 million in debt after also getting clobbered in the midterm elections makes it natural to wonder if the two are linked. The committee, which is responsible for getting Democrats elected to the Senate, still owes $20.4 million after giving up the majority in the body. (Part of the problem is that the committee also bought a house this year, but that’s a different story.) Is there any link between how much a committee goes into debt — reflecting, one assumes, fundraising difficulties — and its performance?

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The Fix: Democrats’ Senate arm ended 2014 $20 million in debt. That’s not why they lost.

News that the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee is over $20 million in debt after also getting clobbered in the midterm elections makes it natural to wonder if the two are linked. The committee, which is responsible for getting Democrats elected to the Senate, still owes $20.4 million after giving up the majority in the body. (Part of the problem is that the committee also bought a house this year, but that’s a different story.) Is there any link between how much a committee goes into debt — reflecting, one assumes, fundraising difficulties — and its performance?

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The Fix: The industries that brought you the new Senate

Shortly after Election Day, we created a chart that showed the spending by outside groups in a number of key Senate races. It’s here, and it’s useful information — particularly in light of the increased percentage of federal election spending which never touches an actual campaign (or party) organization.

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Landrieu ad claims GOP will impeach Obama if Cassidy wins

A new radio ad approved by Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) claims that if Rep. Bill Cassidy (R) defeats her in Saturday’s runoff, Republicans will impeach President Obama.

In the ad, Rep. Cedric Richmond (D-La.), a Landrieu supporter, says, “Have you heard the crazy stuff Bill Cassidy, Bobby Jindal, and the Republicans are always saying about President Obama? They have shown our president so much disrespect. They said he wasn’t a U.S. citizen. They even sued him. And if Cassidy wins, they will impeach him.”

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The Fix: How the Deep South turned red, animated

If Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) loses Saturday’s run-off election — as she is very likely to do — the Deep South will not have a single governor, senator  or state legislature that is in Democratic hands.

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Republicans closing in on ninth Senate pickup in Louisiana

The Republican Party stands on the brink of putting an exclamation point on its hugely successful midterm election with the GOP challenger for U.S. Senate in Louisiana well-positioned to dislodge the Democratic incumbent in a runoff election early next month.

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This Thanksgiving ad attacks Obama for two minutes straight (VIDEO)

A conservative super PAC is marking the Thanksgiving holiday by releasing a two-minute ad that relentlessly attacks President Obama’s record.

The Conservative War Chest ad, released Wednesday, is designed to help Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.), the front-runner against Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) in next month’s U.S. Senate runoff. But there is no mention of Cassidy until his name flashes onscreen at the very end.

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The Fix: The most dominant state parties over the past decade are in Massachusetts and Idaho

For all of the success of the Republican party earlier this month, there were two streaks that the GOP couldn’t touch. Democrats in Massachusetts have now won over 100 straight House races in the state, and Republicans haven’t unseated a Democrat in California since 1994.

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Underdog Landrieu brings her campaign to Monday Night Football

Are you ready for some football? How about some Senate runoff campaign action?

The two worlds are set to collide Monday evening when underdog Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) appears at the Saints-Ravens game in New Orleans to commemorate National Adoption Month and Day.

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The Fix: The 2014 battle for the House was about as competitive as the Globetrotters vs. the Generals

With only a few House races still outstanding (including a couple in Louisiana waiting for Dec. 6 runoffs), we have a pretty clear picture of how the 2014 elections unfolded. For example, we can now say with certainty that, despite the wave in the rest of the country, Republicans have now gone 10 cycles without beating a Democratic incumbent in California. (If it’s any consolation to California Republicans, their peers in Massachusetts haven’t won any House seats in their past 91 tries.)

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The Fix: The Democratic Party’s No. 1 problem, visualized

In the short period after the 2014 midterm near-sweep for the Republican Party, Democrats have quickly assumed the hand-wringing worrier role that the GOP perfected two years ago. For Democrats, working-class whites assumed the role that Latino voters played for Republicans after Romney’s drubbing. (Or, compared to 2014, his light spanking.)

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The Fix: A bipartisan ‘unity ticket’ actually won this year. That’s rare.

This summer, most people assumed that Alaska Gov. Sean Parnell (R) would easily win reelection. He was facing two candidates who were splitting the votes of those looking for someone new to run the state, which is often the best setup a less-than-popular incumbent can hope for (see: Maine gubernatorial race). But then, the two opponents decided to join forces and form the Alaska First Unity ticket. Bill Walker, a former mayor and former Republican, ran as an independent gubernatorial candidate, and Democrat Byron Mallott joined him as the lieutenant governor candidate.

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The Fix: How did The Fix’s ’40 Under 40′ do in the 2014 elections? Pretty well.

There’s a funny thing about being a rising star in politics: Sometimes your star abruptly stops rising.

As in, you lose.

Earlier this year, The Fix highlighted 40 young politicians and operatives under 40 years old who could be serious political players in the near future. We called it “40 Under 40.”

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The Fix: 3 reasons Harry Reid loses in 2016, and 4 reasons he wins

For the third time in eight years, a sitting Senate leader has survived a hard-fought reelection campaign.

Soon-to-be-Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) overcame Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) by 15 points on Nov. 4, but the lopsided result masked what had been a very close race. And McConnell certainly had to work for it after rolling into the 2014 cycle with subpar approval ratings.

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The Fix: Democrats search for an elusive silver lining in the House

After every battle, you have winners, you have losers, and you have the losers who try very hard to find a silver lining.

In the 2014 election, Republicans claimed victory, Democrats lost the Senate majority and the Democrats in charge of trying to 300 a midterm cycle where they didn’t have much to work with are trying to find a bit of treasure in all the debris.

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The Fix: Midterm voters were more liberal on ballot measures than on candidates

Voters in last week’s midterm elections appear to have voted more liberally on ballot measures than on the candidates running for office — even in more conservative states and on more conservative ballot measures.

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A ton of people didn’t vote because they couldn’t get time off from work

You’ve heard the news by now that turnout in the 2014 midterms was the lowest in any election since 1942, when voters were busy with, you know, other stuff. In short, only 36 percent of the voting-age population bothered to cast a ballot last week. A large proportion of them simply aren’t registered to vote at all. But past numbers suggest upwards of 20 percent of Americans adults were registered to vote, but couldn’t be bothered to – what’s their excuse?

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The Fix: How urban voters failed Democrats in 2014

We’re still waiting to see precisely how much of key portions of the so-called “Obama Coalition” stayed home last week, including black voters, Hispanics, unmarried women and young people.

But here’s a pretty good approximation for just why Democrats struggled so much on Election Day.

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The Fix: The outside money spent in the 11 closest Senate races, in 1 chart

With the 2014 Senate races (mostly, except two) wrapped up, it’s worth a quick dip into the murky waters of outside campaign spending to see what engorged fish were swimming around under our … boats? (The metaphor sort of fell apart there.)

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The Fix: We probably just saw one of the lowest-turnout elections in American history

Turnout was low last week. Not “midterm low,” or “unusually low,” but “historically low.” As we noted on Monday, it was probably the lowest since World War II. But it was possibly also one of the four lowest-turnout elections since the election of Thomas Jefferson. You know, before there was such a thing as “Alabama.”

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