Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids

Donald Trump’s anti-immigrant crackdown is terrorizing a generation of Latino children, with research from CAP showing that mass deportation policies “create toxic stress for young children by breaking families apart, instilling fear in the immigrant community, and preventing families from accessing programs that meet children’s most basic needs.”

With an estimated six million U.S. citizen kids having at least one undocumented family member in their household, “policies that cause children emotional distress and economic insecurity in early childhood interfere with their healthy development and derail their future success”:

Being separated from a parent or caregiver—or even the idea of a separation—exposes young children to stress and trauma. In extreme cases, children may be present during immigration raids, where armed U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents may burst into a home and forcibly remove parents. Children who have been separated from their parents frequently show signs of trauma, including

Continue reading “Trump’s deportation crackdown stands to damage a generation of American kids”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

The new ‘Jane Crow’ in the foster care system separates children from their poor mothers

Ideally, in America, people would not be punished simply because they are poor. And yet we know the reality is that many systems and structures in society are designed so that people with money and influence can navigate life in ways that allows them to escape certain forms of punishment. This has been well documented in many instances like bail reform, punishment of the Wall Street bankers who helped create the 2008 economic crisis, and our current president, his son, and son-in-law who have clearly colluded with Russia to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election—despite their claims to the contrary.

One way we don’t often think of how this manifests is when it comes to parenting. Yet many women, most often women of color, find themselves the victims of children’s services agencies who can take custody of their children for child endangerment—often with little evidence to support those claims. 

[In New York City, the Administration for

Continue reading “The new ‘Jane Crow’ in the foster care system separates children from their poor mothers”

Children increasingly impacted by the opioid epidemic, but Republicans won’t do anything about it

As lawmakers try to figure out what to do about America’s increasing opioid epidemic, there is one group largely left out of the discussion—children. Children of drug addicts are often left to fend for themselves since their parents are unable to manage an addiction and be responsible caregivers at the same time. In many ways, Ohio has served as ground zero. It has one of the nation’s highest overdose rates and the amount of children who are now in court custody has jumped from 69 to 274 in the last three years. The number of children in foster care also increased nationally by 30,000 between 2012 and 2015 and this is due to, in great part, to the worsening of opioid abuse. This puts tremendous strain on a system which is already under resourced and underfunded. And, sadly, funds to child welfare programs are steadily decreasing. 

In 14 states, from New Hampshire to

Continue reading “Children increasingly impacted by the opioid epidemic, but Republicans won’t do anything about it”

Researchers study link between child poverty and brain development—with no government support

Being poor in America is terrible for anyone—but it is particularly hard on children. Studies have shown that experiencing poverty in childhood significantly impacts one’s ability to be successful as an adult and children from poor families are less likely to work in adulthood than their counterparts from middle-class or wealthy families. Currently, in the United States around 15 million children (or 21 percent) live in poverty, with particularly high rates for black and Hispanic children, children with single mothers and children under the age of five. These statistics are grim. And, now, making childhood poverty even more dire, scientists have also discovered that there is a clear link to poverty and brain development.

In 2015, [Dr. Kimberly Noble, a scientist at Columbia University] co-authored the largest study to date. Using MRI, researchers examined 1,099 children and young adults and found that the brains of those with higher family income and more parental

Continue reading “Researchers study link between child poverty and brain development—with no government support”

Kids pay for our obsession with guns, as shootings are the third leading cause of death for children

We are a nation with a serious gun problem that can’t seem to come to terms with this. With mass shootings on the rise in the last several decades, it seems as if nothing will shame us into action—not even knowing that the problem is deeply impacting our children. But at the very least, we should not remain in denial. Gun violence is devastating the country and no one is being spared—least of all the nation’s kids. In fact, according to a new report, shootings are now the third leading cause of death for kids ages 1 to 17.

The results show that almost 1,300 children in the U.S. die from gunshot wounds yearly, and an additional 5,790 children are treated for gunshot wounds and survive each year, the researchers found. […]

In other words, “About 19 children a day die or are medically treated in

Continue reading “Kids pay for our obsession with guns, as shootings are the third leading cause of death for children”

A 6-year-old St. Louis boy makes a passionate plea to end gun violence in a video that goes viral

Your probably don’t remember what your biggest fear was when you were six. Maybe it was losing your favorite toy, not getting to eat your favorite food, or getting separated from your parents in a crowd. For most of us, our biggest fear was likely not the fear of death from gun violence, though that is now a growing issue of concern for kids in certain parts of the country—and for one 6-year-old in particular.

Leanndra Cheatham of St. Louis posted a video of her 6-year-old son Jeffrey to Facebook last week that has now been viewed more than 130,000 times. In it, he makes a passionate plea for gun violence in the city to come to an end, and it is heartbreaking. 

“People need to stop killing each other around here because this is just making me feel bad,” Jeffrey says in the video, while standing in what appears to be

Continue reading “A 6-year-old St. Louis boy makes a passionate plea to end gun violence in a video that goes viral”