Gov’t reports 209,000 new jobs created in July; jobless rate at 4.3%; Trump claims credit

The seasonally adjusted net gain of jobs in July, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics report released Friday, was 209,000. Of those, 172,000 were created in the private sector, 37,000  in the public sector, as determined by analysis of the Current Employment Survey of 147,000 business establishments. A consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts earlier this week had concluded there would be a gain of 178,000 new jobs in July.

Once again, which has been the case for most of the past eight years since the recovery from the Great Recession officially began, wages climbed only a smidgen. Compared with last July, they were up 9 cents an hour, a 2.5 percent year-over-year rise against an annual inflation rate of 1.6 percent. For the average worker, the wage gain has amounted to barely treading water.

As it does in every monthly report, the bureau revised its counts for the previous two months based on more complete

Continue reading “Gov’t reports 209,000 new jobs created in July; jobless rate at 4.3%; Trump claims credit”

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This week in the war on workers: Here are the economic issues Ohio swing voters care about most

We hear a lot about the economic populism that Donald Trump supposedly tapped into and that Democrats must reclaim to win. But what does that look like on the ground? Working America canvassed 355 likely midterm swing voters in Ohio, asking them about Trumpcare, a range of economic policies to support middle-class and lower-income families, Ohio politicians, and where they’re getting their political information. The resulting report offers a wealth of information.

Opposition to Trumpcare was strong, with just 39 percent of Trump swing voters in favor of passing it, while “Overall, 60 percent of Ohio swing voters we spoke with chose it from a list of 11 policies as the one that would have the most negative impact on their family.” Beyond that, voters’ top three issues off that list were stopping outsourcing, addressing the opioid crisis, and paid family leave. Expanding overtime, passing paid sick days,

Continue reading “This week in the war on workers: Here are the economic issues Ohio swing voters care about most”

This week in the war on workers: Here are the economic issues Ohio swing voters care about most

We hear a lot about the economic populism that Donald Trump supposedly tapped into and that Democrats must reclaim to win. But what does that look like on the ground? Working America canvassed 355 likely midterm swing voters in Ohio, asking them about Trumpcare, a range of economic policies to support middle-class and lower-income families, Ohio politicians, and where they’re getting their political information. The resulting report offers a wealth of information.

Opposition to Trumpcare was strong, with just 39 percent of Trump swing voters in favor of passing it, while “Overall, 60 percent of Ohio swing voters we spoke with chose it from a list of 11 policies as the one that would have the most negative impact on their family.” Beyond that, voters’ top three issues off that list were stopping outsourcing, addressing the opioid crisis, and paid family leave. Expanding overtime, passing paid sick days,

Continue reading “This week in the war on workers: Here are the economic issues Ohio swing voters care about most”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”