EPA administrator Scott Pruitt continues to be terrible at his job

New Trump EPA administrator Scott Pruitt had two choices after hurricanes Harvey and Irma. He could rise to the challenges of his office, or he could tool around the country pooh-poohing people who asked about climate change, giving friendly interviews to conspiracy sites like Breitbart and issuing furious ad hominem attacks on journalists who questioned the EPA’s seemingly less-than-robust response to the chemical explosions and spills accompanying the storms.

He, of course, chose the latter. And mind you, I suspect most of us were prepared for how beholden to polluting industries Scott Pruitt would be, because that is precisely how he auditioned for his current position; what’s more surprising is just how petulant the man would be. He appears to be running the entire department as an exercise in self-gratification and extended bouts of pouting.

“I’ve got to say this to you: what is it about the past administration?” Pruitt

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Open thread for night owls: ‘It’s time to move away from the coasts.’

Elizabeth Rush writes that as sea levels rise and flooding becomes more commonplace in coastal communities, our rebuilding efforts should more often become relocation plans.

That two storms of Harvey and Irma’s caliber would make landfall in the United States during the same swampy fortnight seemed exceptional at first — and then, of course, it didn’t. That’s because surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, where many hurricanes are born, are between 0.5 degrees Celsius and 1 degree Celsius above average this year. Warmer seas, combined with higher atmospheric temperatures, feed storms, helping turn average hurricanes into spectacularly destructive events. Add accelerated sea level rise into the mix, and you get large swaths of North American coastline inundated in previously unimaginable amounts of water.

Many living in Louisiana, New York, on the edges of the Olympic Peninsula and all along the coast of Alaska have recently found themselves in the

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The Trump admin auctioned off an imperiled bird habitat to oil companies for a whopping $14,837

The Trump administration has auctioned off acres of habitat for the sage-grouse, which narrowly missed making the endangered species list after an extensive plan to preserve the bird’s habitat took effect during the Obama administration. Which, naturally means Trump is dead set marching back the progress. From Westwise:

Sage-grouse, a chicken-sized bird once widespread in the West, have seen their populations drop dramatically in recent years, thanks in part to oil and gas development. In an effort to keep the sage-grouse off the endangered species list — a move that would limit all forms of development throughout the region — ranchers, conservationists, Western governors and the Obama administration spent years working on collaborative plans to help the species rebound. Widely hailed as a success, the plans resulted in former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announcing that the sage-grouse would avoid the endangered species list. Unfortunately, this success story is under

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A big earthquake could turn Cushing, Oklahoma, into one of the worst oil-related eco-disasters ever

Kathryn Miles, author of the new book Quakeland: On the Road To America’s Next Devastating Earthquakehas written a piece at Politico on the kind of subject most people don’t think about until after a disaster. She explores what would happen if a big earthquake struck at or near Cushing, Oklahoma, a crossroads of 14 major oil pipelines and hundreds of tanks holding, in the latest tally, nearly 60 million barrels of unrefined oil.

In her investigation, she discovered the dirty little secret of this reservoir of fossil fuel—the minuscule federal agency that supposedly regulates safety standards for these tanks doesn’t regulate or set standards for them. And these tanks and the pipelines that feed them simply aren’t prepared to ride out a major quake.

If there were a major one that broke pipelines and split, say, half those tanks, the environmental disaster would make the Exxon Valdez spill of 260,000 barrels of oil near

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COMIC: Category 5 global-warming-denial to make landfall

FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN Tom the Dancing Bug’s subscription club, the Proud & Mighty INNER HIVE, for exclusive early access to comics, extra comics, and much more.

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. (”Filled with wild twists and funny dialogue” -Publishers Weekly)  Book One here.  Book Two here.

COMIC: Category 5 global-warming-denial to make landfall

FOLLOW @RubenBolling on the Twitters and a Face Book.

JOIN Tom the Dancing Bug’s subscription club, the Proud & Mighty INNER HIVE, for exclusive early access to comics, extra comics, and much more.

GET Ruben Bolling’s new hit book series for kids, The EMU Club Adventures. (”Filled with wild twists and funny dialogue” -Publishers Weekly)  Book One here.  Book Two here.

Spotlight on green news & views: Florida on borrowed time; Scott Pruitt’s EPA wrecking ball

This is the 525th edition of the Spotlight on Green News & Views (previously known as the Green Diary Rescue) usually appears twice a week, on Wednesdays and Saturdays.  Here is the Sept. 9 Green Spotlight. More than 27,735 environmentally oriented stories have been rescued to appear in this series since 2006. Inclusion of a story in the Spotlight does not necessarily indicate my agreement with or endorsement of it.

OUTSTANDING GREEN STORIES

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Here I am sitting in one of my favorite places.  Just a few miles from the Norse Peak fire, we haven’t been able to get back to this gem of a watering hole since our last visit in July. We call this our ‘Lord of the Rings’ scene.

Silent Spring writes—Washington State wildfires: a personal picture diary of majestic beauty and destruction: “I can barely look at any pictures

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