This week in the war on workers: CEOs being paid 271 times the average worker

The Economic Policy Institute is out with its annual look at CEO pay, and by two measures, the pay of CEOs at the nation’s 350 largest companies is nauseating: 271 times what the typical worker made. Though that ratio is down from its peak, consider that in 1989, the ratio was 59 to one. That means we’re talking about a shift that happened during the lives of Millennials. 

  • Using the stock-options-realized measure, the average CEO compensation for CEOs in the 350 largest U.S. firms was $15.6 million in 2016. Compensation in 2016 (data available through May) is down 4.3 percent (from $16.3 million) since 2015 but up 45.6 percent (from $10.7 million) since the recovery began in 2009. The fall in average compensation reflected a loss for the highest-paid CEOs while those in the bottom 80 percent earned more in 2016 than in

    Continue reading “This week in the war on workers: CEOs being paid 271 times the average worker”

This week in the war on workers: CEOs being paid 271 times the average worker

The Economic Policy Institute is out with its annual look at CEO pay, and by two measures, the pay of CEOs at the nation’s 350 largest companies is nauseating: 271 times what the typical worker made. Though that ratio is down from its peak, consider that in 1989, the ratio was 59 to one. That means we’re talking about a shift that happened during the lives of Millennials. 

  • Using the stock-options-realized measure, the average CEO compensation for CEOs in the 350 largest U.S. firms was $15.6 million in 2016. Compensation in 2016 (data available through May) is down 4.3 percent (from $16.3 million) since 2015 but up 45.6 percent (from $10.7 million) since the recovery began in 2009. The fall in average compensation reflected a loss for the highest-paid CEOs while those in the bottom 80 percent earned more in 2016 than in

    Continue reading “This week in the war on workers: CEOs being paid 271 times the average worker”

Likely Trump pick for enforcing federal wage laws sued for stiffing her house cleaners

Ah, finally a good old-fashioned Trump hiring story, the kind our days were filled with in the first weeks of the administration as Trump stuffed his team with fellow narcissistic, promoted-above-their-pay-grade, antithesis-of-their-supposed-job jackasses. Let’s all bask in the news that the person Donald Trump is “expected” to tap as top enforcer of federal wage and overtime rules was sued just last year for not paying her house cleaners.

Laurie Titus of Sunflower Cleaning Group stated in her suit that [current head of South Carolina’s Department of Employment and Workforce Cheryl Stanton] failed to pay for four house cleaning visits, at $90 each.
“I have emailed, mailed, and certified mailed trying to get payment,” the lawsuit said.

Well you can see why Trump likes her. Donald has nothing but respect for people who try to stiff their workers for a decent day’s work. It’s also very important to him that he

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This week in the war on workers: Ivanka’s real brand is exploitation

You should read this Washington Post investigation of Ivanka Trump’s clothing manufacturing practices for a lot of reasons—to hear from the workers, to be reminded how far Trump rhetoric on workers diverges from Trump practice, and to learn something about what goes into your clothes, Ivanka-branded or not. Sample:

A 25-year-old woman said PT Buma hires her as a fabric cutter on a day-to-day basis, paying her a monthly salary that ranges between $68 to $135 for as much as 24 days of work — far below the region’s minimum wage and a rate that workers advocates say is probably a violation of local law.

The fabric cutter and her husband have to borrow money to cover their daily expenses and those of their 10-year-old son, who lives 45 minutes away with his grandmother. She sees him about once a month.

Their possessions consist of her husband’s motorbike and their

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Cartoon: Tesla’s Model 3 and Cheap-Labor-For-You, Inc.

I’m on vacation but wanted to repost this cartoon as Tesla begins to roll out it’s new Model 3 this week. Besides being really super-dooper cool and high tech, Teslas come with some increasing labor issues, too.  

Every once in a while a story comes along that really shocks and surprises me, often right in my backyard. This is one of those stories. How could the Tesla car company, symbol of forward-thinking, wealth and techie cool have people from Eastern Europe working at their Bay Area factory making $5 an hour?! That’s right, over a hundred people were brought to Tesla’s Fremont, California plant from places like Slovenia and Croatia to work ten-hour days making $5 an hour.

These guys built a huge new paint shop at the Tesla factory that is rapidly ramping-up production for the Tesla Model 3. (Tesla has

Continue reading “Cartoon: Tesla’s Model 3 and Cheap-Labor-For-You, Inc.”

This week in the war on workers: Washington state gets paid family leave

Paid family leave is becoming law in Washington state. The state legislature passed and Gov. Jay Inslee has signed a law giving workers up to 12 weeks of paid family leave for birth, adoption, or the worker’s own or a family member’s medical condition, and up to 16 weeks in a year:

The Washington state program would benefit low-wage workers because those earning less than half of the state’s weekly average would receive 90 percent of their income—to a maximum of $1,000 per week. The benefits are based on a percentage of the worker’s average weekly wage and the state’s weekly average wage, which was $1,133 in 2016.

The program is largely funded by workers, who will pay a premium of 0.4 percent of their wages each paycheck into a state-run insurance fund. This would cost a minimum-wage worker about 3 cents an hour, according to the bill’s sponsor.

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Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ reported Friday morning that the seasonally adjusted net gain was 187,000 private-sector jobs in June, with 35,000 added in the public sector, for a total of 222,000. The consensus of experts in Bloomberg’s survey of experts conducted earlier in the week had forecast a gain of 170,000 new jobs. It was the best advance since February. 

The bureau also revised its previous reports of job gains for May from 138,000 to 152,000, and for April from 174,000 to 207,000.  

June marked the 81st consecutive month of overall job growth. A separate survey placed the headline unemployment rate—which the bureau labels U3—at 4.4 percent, an historically low rate. The last time the unemployment rate was at this level was 10 years ago, in May 2007. The lowest the rate has been in the past quarter-century was 3.8 percent in April 2000.

So, once again, the Trump

Continue reading “Government reports stronger than expected job gains in June. April and May gains revised upward”

This week in the war on workers: When three days sick means losing a month’s grocery budget

Nearly two-thirds of private-sector workers in the U.S. have access to paid sick leave, but as with so many labor and economic statistics, that masks serious inequality: 87 percent of the top 10 percent of earners have paid sick leave, while just 27 percent of the bottom 10 percent do. And what that means is that the people who can least afford to take a day off without pay are the ones who are forced to do so if they’re too sick to go to work. A new Economic Policy Institute analysis shows how devastating that choice can be:

Without the ability to earn paid sick days, workers must choose between going to work sick (or sending a child to school sick) and losing much-needed pay. For the average worker who does not have access to paid sick days, the costs of taking unpaid sick time can make

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Republican senators in five states will face AFL-CIO ad campaign against Trumpcare

Unions fought hard to pass healthcare reform in 2009 and 2010 (and before) and they’re part of the fight against Republican efforts to take us back to the bad old days by passing Trumpcare with a campaign targeting Republican senators in five states:

[AFL-CIO President Richard] Trumka told reporters in a conference call Wednesday that the bill would deprive millions of working people of health insurance. The federation is running thousands of ads to pressure Senate Republicans in Alaska, Ohio, West Virginia, Nevada and Maine. He is urging Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska to join other Republicans in opposing the bill.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell will spend his recess working to get the votes needed to pass Trumpcare. The resistance needs to be working to kill it dead, and America’s largest union federation is obviously doing just that.

Make your Republican senator feel the heat. Call their office EVERY

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Who’s pushing for the Republican healthcare bill? Industries that treat their employees like crap

Campaign Action

One of the most impressive bits about the Republican push to defund Obamacare and thoroughly gut Medicaid is their insistence on doing so despite furious opposition from doctors, medical groups, patients groups, the AARP, and oh-by-the-way the American voting public, and by a very wide margin. Everyone aside from Republican leadership and conservative anti-government groups recognizes that the Republican “plan” will decimate the insurance markets, leave millions uninsured, toss current Medicaid recipients off the rolls, and get people killed. For a tax cut. That’s the only upside: Some rich folks get a tax cut.

But that doesn’t mean every American interest group is against it. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce is collecting support from all sorts of business interests who don’t care what the medical industry says, they support the Republican plan to “protect the employer-sponsored system” regardless. Shall we take a look?

There’s the Air Conditioning

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Months after Trump’s hype, Carrier announces 600 layoffs

Remember how, back before the media caught on to Donald Trump’s habit of announcing he’d “created” jobs that had been long planned or “saved” jobs that either didn’t need saving or weren’t actually saved, his Carrier deal was major headline news? Trump supposedly saved 1,000 jobs from being sent to Mexico, and we were supposed to ignore the fact that many of the jobs being “saved” were never planned to be cut, and the giant tax subsidies he doled out to make that happen, and all the jobs that were still going to Mexico, and the fact that the deal was going to help the company eliminate jobs through automation.

Well, Carrier isn’t in the headlines so much these days, which makes it about time for the asterisks on Trump’s big deal to kick in with a vengeance. Layoffs are officially coming for more than 600 workers at the plant:

“The

Continue reading “Months after Trump’s hype, Carrier announces 600 layoffs”

Republicans ready to shut down government in Washington state

Public workers in Washington state are getting temporary layoff notices, as the state could be headed for a government shutdown on July 1 if the Republican-held state Senate and Democratic state House and governor can’t reach a budget agreement before then. The legislature is under court order to fix school underfunding, and—surprise!—Republicans are rejecting most options for adding revenue and refusing to negotiate. The editorial board of The Olympian writes:

Basically this fight didn’t need to play out this way. It pits the Democratic-majority state House against a Republican-controlled Senate, but fundamentally it is ideology on the GOP side that is blocking progress.

The Democrats have been realistic about the need for new revenue. Republicans have dug in with fervor against new taxes — with one self-serving exception.

The GOP favors jacking up property taxes on mostly urban areas that have sky-high property valuations, housing affordability issues and Democratic

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Trump’s team continues to dismantle protection and oversight of civil rights in government agencies

The Trump administration continues to send the message loud and clear that it sees civil rights as optional. Under the leadership of Jeff Sessions, the Department of Justice seems to be moving away from consent decrees—court-enforced agreements that have historically been used as a tool to protect civil rights by doing such things as reforming police departments, ensuring equal access for minorities and desegregating school systems. Without consent decrees, there is no federal oversight of the changes that these organizations are required to make which means little to no accountability. Sadly, this rollback is not limited to the DOJ. In its most recently proposed budget, Trump’s team proposed massive cuts to civil rights and minority protections in several agencies. This has left employees who work in civil rights divisions across the government wondering what will become of their work and how they will be able to protect the rights of the American people.

All

Continue reading “Trump’s team continues to dismantle protection and oversight of civil rights in government agencies”

Trump’s team continues to dismantle protection and oversight of civil rights in government agencies

The Trump administration continues to send the message loud and clear that it sees civil rights as optional. Under the leadership of Jeff Sessions, the Department of Justice seems to be moving away from consent decrees—court-enforced agreements that have historically been used as a tool to protect civil rights by doing such things as reforming police departments, ensuring equal access for minorities and desegregating school systems. Without consent decrees, there is no federal oversight of the changes that these organizations are required to make which means little to no accountability. Sadly, this rollback is not limited to the DOJ. In its most recently proposed budget, Trump’s team proposed massive cuts to civil rights and minority protections in several agencies. This has left employees who work in civil rights divisions across the government wondering what will become of their work and how they will be able to protect the rights of the American people.

All

Continue reading “Trump’s team continues to dismantle protection and oversight of civil rights in government agencies”

This week in the war on workers: ‘Infrastructure Week’ flops

Did you have fun during “Infrastructure Week”? Did you think about infrastructure policy day in, day out? You know who didn’t think about infrastructure policy much this week? Donald Trump, Mr. Infrastructure Week himself. Or, if he thought about it, it sure hasn’t shown up in his public appearances:

It all began on an odd note on Monday, when the president vowed to privatize air traffic control — hardly an urgently desired infrastructure improvement — and then signed a set of air traffic control “principles” in what can only be described as a pantomime of a bill signing.

In hindsight, that might have been the most substantive component of Infrastructure Week. The president visited Cincinnati, Ohio on Wednesday to deliver a campaign rally-style pitch for his proposed infrastructure plan, though he offered none of the specifics that would bring said plan into focus. Instead, he veered off topic

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