White Trump voters believe whites are the most discriminated against, despite facts to the contrary

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If this past presidential election has done nothing else, it has served as an important reminder that America is a country deeply divided across racial lines. One of the ways that this racial tension and animosity manifests itself is through the conflict around resources—who has them, who doesn’t and overall access to them. In an increasingly diverse and multicultural America, which at the same time is undergoing enormous economic shifts, some whites believe that they are being left behind. This is the platform that Donald Trump ran on. The “Make America Great Again” slogan fed into his voters beliefs that white people are increasingly the victims of bias and discrimination and that the country should be returned to a time when whites had it “better.” This is his justification for racist policies like the Justice Department’s investigation into colleges and universities that allegedly discriminate against white students. Except, well, facts.

While this is a

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NAACP issues travel warning for Missouri based on its new ‘Jim Crow Bill’

We’ve had no shortage of baffling, head scratching and nauseating moments in the last six months. Republicans are determined to take us back in time with regard to every indicator in terms of social progress and equality—and they aren’t stopping anytime soon. In Missouri, Gov. Eric Greitens recently signed a bill that could only be described as a throwback. In fact, the local NAACP is calling it the “Jim Crow Bill.” And they are warning travelers about visiting the state now that the bill has been signed into law.

Americans used to getting warnings about the potential dangers of traveling overseas, but this summer, the NAACP put out an extraordinary warning about travel here at home — in Missouri.

The warning advises “extreme caution,” saying travelers could be subject to “discrimination and harassment.”

The bill has to do with the ability to file discrimination claims on the basis of race,

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‘Left,’ ‘progressive,’ and ‘working-class’ do not mean ‘white’

There is a long tradition of left-of-center politics in the United States. But too often when reading positions espoused by white political activists, writers, bloggers, and pundits who have dubbed themselves progressive, left of center, radical, or even liberal, they speak as if the mantle of the left does not fall across the shoulders of black Americans and other people of color.

Recently, the mere mention of ‘black’ has come under attack from some segments of this erstwhile left. It has been dubbed ‘identity politics’ and dismissed as irrelevant in the struggle to re-engage ‘the working class’ by the ‘progressive’ wing of the Democratic Party.

A line from Marvin Gaye’s Inner City Blues sums up how I feel about much of this: “Makes me wanna holler and throw up both my hands.”

Too often the “we progressives” line does not include me and mine and the long unbroken stream of my political ancestors and mentors—everyone from Frederick Douglass, Ida

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Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes

Our favorite childhood stories are always filled with special memories and revisiting them as an adult is never quite the same—especially when we are able to understand the context behind them. While many images, characters and expressions seem filled with innocence at the time we view them through the lens of our youth, we often learn with age that they are reflective of stereotypes or outdated beliefs better left in the past.  

One professor is doing his part to bring this to light by examining how racism in children’s books perpetuates harmful beliefs about certain groups of people. 

In his new book, Was the Cat in the Hat Black? The Hidden Racism of Children’s Literature, and the Need for Diverse Books, Philip Nel studies the paradox of stories that are meant to nurture but can also do harm. An English professor at Kansas State University, Nel has probed racism in kids’ books in his classes

Continue reading “Exploring racism in children’s books provides opportunities for understanding racist stereotypes”

School segregation increases as communities secede from school districts to create wealthier ones

In May, a report by released by UCLA’s Civil Rights Project and Penn State University’s Center for Education and Civil Rights confirmed that school segregation in the South is on the rise, with more black and Latino students attending intensely segregated, high-poverty schools than in the past several decades.

It’s easy to assume this can be attributed to systemic inequality—the rise of charter schools, poor funding to the most needy schools, white flight to the suburbs, and increasingly segregated neighborhoods. All of this is true, but it can also be attributed to a rising phenomenon occurring all across the country: smaller communities seceding away from larger school districts in order to form smaller, wealthier, and whiter ones. In this way, school segregation persists, with white parents who have some financial means doing their best to create borders around their schools that keep poor black and brown students out.

Five years ago, organizers in Gardendale,

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David Brooks tries to explain ‘woke’ to the rest of us, fails miserably

David Brooks should really stop trying to explain stuff to the rest of us. While he has a specific perspective that, for some inexplicable reason, appeals to some fan base out there somewhere, he is most definitely unqualified to speak on certain topics. After the Women’s March, he wasted his words (and valuable space in the New York Times), mansplaining why the marches would do little for social change. In his not-at-all-worth reading nonsensical essay, he boiled down the entirety of the many women’s marches that took place around the country and world to identity politics and women’s issues with patriarchy. Talk about someone without a clue—this tone-deaf perspective makes him come across as if he’s never even talked to a woman before in his life.  But, not to worry, he’s not to be outdone. This week, he decided to write about what cool looks like in America today. 

The

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Massachusetts police do not have authority to detain undocumented immigrants for ICE says high court

Reuters is reporting that Massachusetts’ Supreme Judicial Court has ruled that police officers cannot detain undocumented immigrants without cause—and holding them while waiting for federal law enforcement officers is not an acceptable reason.

The Supreme Judicial Court ruled that doing so amounts to a fresh arrest of the person that is not authorized by state law, in the first such ruling to apply to an entire state, according to Massachusetts’ attorney general.

“Massachusetts law provides no authority for Massachusetts court officers to arrest and hold an individual solely on the basis of a Federal civil immigration detainer, beyond the time that the individual would otherwise be entitled to be released from State custody,” the court wrote in its decision.

The case in front of the court concerned a Cambodian man named Sreynuon Lunn who had been detained on a larceny case that ended up being dismissed.

Lunn, who had a

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On this, John McCain has been a true leader

I hope Senator John McCain has many years left, and that he is able to enjoy them with his friends and loved ones. He has served our country with bravery and with distinction, and suffered a great deal for it while being held as a prisoner of war. There is no doubt that he loves America. I also hope the next person who sits in his Senate seat is a Democrat, just as I do for any seat held by a Republican.

As for McCain’s political positions on major issues over the years, I disagreed with him most of the time, although less often than some other Republicans. And yes, he brought Sarah Palin on to the national stage, something that will always be a low point in his career. Let’s not revisit those issues here, or offer a list of the damaging legislation or policies he supported. That doesn’t mean they

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Persistent redlining and employment discrimination have hurt black Americans’ chance at wealth

One of the most difficult things about trying to talk race in this country is the fact that our knowledge of and agreement on basic facts is so varied. While most of us know that the enslavement and segregation of black people gravely impacted their economic opportunity at one point in time, there is a serious disconnect about what came after.

While many black people are intimately familiar with the practice of redlining (which refers to a combination of housing discrimination and obstructive lending practices which prevent blacks from obtaining home ownership), it is difficult for others to concede the idea that wealth has been systematically denied from blacks long after segregation ended. Recent economic research not only continues to confirm the existence of redlining but also shows that redlining never went away—and is part of the reason that the wealth gap between whites and blacks remains so stark to this day. 

A new study 

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Man accused of killing Richard Collins III is not being charged with a hate crime. Why not?

Black people in America are beyond tired of being gaslighted when it comes to talking about our experiences with racism. In case you don’t know what gaslighting is, it’s when someone manipulates or brainwashes another person in an effort to get that person to question their own reality or sanity. It is a tool of abuse and control—a power tactic designed to get you to distrust yourself and to trust your abuser instead. As black folk, our entire relationship with America is one big example of gaslighting, repeated over and over again for centuries, ad infinitum. In individual relationships, we may experience this when we work up the courage to share our humiliating experiences of racism with a cherished white or non-black friend or colleague—only to have them try to convince us that the world is now post-racial and that anti-black racism isn’t really a thing or is just the product of our

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University of Missouri struggles to recruit students two years after protests about racial injustice

Millennials often get saddled with the reputation of being lazy and entitled, but there is little doubt that this generation is socially aware and politically active. From Ferguson to Baltimore and other demonstrations against racial injustice, young people are protesting en masse and standing up for what they believe in. This has been a phenomenon several years in the making. 

At the University of Missouri, escalating tensions about race reached fever pitch in 2015. Students were protesting that the administration hadn’t done enough to respond to a series of racist incidents on campus. This was followed by protests by graduate students who staged a hunger strike, and finally by the football team, which refused to play. That was enough to force the university’s president and chancellor to step down. But two years later, the school’s reputation has yet to recover

Freshman enrollment at the Columbia campus, the system’s flagship, has fallen by more

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Bakersfield police assault black teenage girl, stating she looks like male suspect with machete

There is a long-standing history of black women being portrayed as hyper-masculine and unfeminine. And because white supremacy thrives on this narrative, we constantly have to prove that we are worthy of dignity in comparison to our white female counterparts. While white women are given the benefit of being seen as delicate and worthy of protection, black womanhood is reviled—never allowing black women to be fully seen beyond stereotypes that label us as angry, hyper-sexual, sassy or welfare queens. These stereotypes are problematic, of course, because they rob us of the ability to be understood as complex, multi-dimensional beings. But beyond the emotional and cultural violence they pose, they also serve to put our very lives in danger.

Such was the case last month when 19-year-old Tatyana Hargrove was walking home from a store in Bakersfield, California, after shopping for a Father’s Day gift. She was approached by a police officer who claims he mistook her for a

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Arrests, tear gas after Virginia Klan rally brings out 1,000 counterprotesters

North Carolina-based members of the Ku Klux Klan held a Charlottesville, Virginia rally yesterday to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Their small rally drew over 1,000 counter protesters in response, and from there things got out of hand.

For about a half-hour, around 50 members of the Klan — some wearing hooded white robes — shouted “white power” at Justice Park as more than 1,000 people protested their presence by hurling insults, water bottles and apple cores.

The statue of Robert E. Lee is about our heritage, says the group shouting “white power” at their rally.

When it was all over there were 23 arrests and police had dispersed the crowd with tear gas. It appears the trouble began when the Klan members returned to their cars after their rally to drive back home to Not Virginia, but were followed by a large

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Right-wing media politicize murder of NYPD officer to attack Black Lives Matter, Hillary, and Obama

Not long after midnight on Wednesday morning, Miosotis Familia was murdered for being a cop. Alexander Bonds walked up to the command post vehicle where she was sitting, in uniform and on duty, and fired a bullet into her head. According to a preliminary investigation, he ran and officers pursued him. After Bonds fired on the officers, they returned fire and killed him. Bonds was a black man who had taken part in an assault on a police officer in 2001, had expressed anger on social media about police brutality—including abusive treatment he absorbed while in prison—and who had a long history of severe mental illness.

Roma Martinez, who has lived for years in the neighborhood north of Yankee Stadium where Officer Familia was killed, called her “a good policewoman.” Familia lived on Sedgwick Avenue in the Bronx, close to the street where she died. A neighbor, Rafael Mercedes,

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The alt-right has an identity crisis in its movement but we will gladly help them out

It seems like the alt-right has an identity problem. It can’t figure out what it wants to be or what it wants to be called. This confusion is driving a wedge between those deplorables who identify with the label “alt-right” and white supremacist Richard Spencer who has become the face of the movement, and those who identify with the almost the exact same things he stands for but are uncomfortable publicly aligning themselves with his brand of racism and anti-Semitism. That must be deeply difficult for them, poor little things.

And before you ask, yes, they are serious. They actually see a distinction in their ideologies which is splintering the movement in two. 

During the Presidential campaign, the term came to denote several intersecting phenomena: anti-feminism, opposition to political correctness, online abuse, belligerent nihilism, conspiracy theories, inflammatory Internet memes. Some pro-Trump activists adopted this big-tent definition, allowing any youthful, “edgy” critique

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